Scarecrow's Song

A gaming blog by @AlexDCopland

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link
Link is back…not the same Link, mind, it’s a different Link to the one in the first Zelda game. It’s a generational thing, about ancestors and that. But anyway, he’s here on a brand new adventure in Hyrule to save Zelda and destroy Ganon. Sounds like a direct copy of The Legend of Zelda, but I can guarantee you, it is definitely not.
The story is simple. Zelda’s brother wanted to find the Triforce of Courage (a mystical part of a golden triangle that grants the beholder their greatest desire). Zelda knew where it was, but would not tell her brother, so a wizard, a friend of the Prince of Hyrule cast a strong sleeping spell on Zelda. Years later Link is told about Zelda, and so, as a result, you take Link on an adventure through Hyrule to place crystals in six dungeons, to be able to find the Triforce. Oh and, by the way, Ganon is in the process of being resurrected. Find the Triforce and save the world.
To progress in the game, each dungeon, or temple, must be visited and completed in the correct order. By completing some dungeons and collected certain items or by learning particular spells from the elders in the towns, you can move into areas previously inaccessible. The main difference in gameplay is the mixture of a far out top down view and the side scrolling platformer view. Link can jump and duck when in this view, with fighting being less frenzied sword swiping and more tactical offense and defense. There is also an experience system where attack, magic and health can be upgraded using points gained from killing enemies. This is an in depth action RPG.
If I haven’t made it clear already, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is an incredibly difficult game (the number of times I’ve died…), yet it’s incredibly satisfying to play. It’s a game of many introductions in the Zelda series. The introduction to towns, conversational characters and Dark Link. As for the immersion side of thing, it’s game of discovery, peril and real adventure. Zelda II is truly magical and is essential to any gamer, even if it is a little different to what may be expected.

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link

Link is back…not the same Link, mind, it’s a different Link to the one in the first Zelda game. It’s a generational thing, about ancestors and that. But anyway, he’s here on a brand new adventure in Hyrule to save Zelda and destroy Ganon. Sounds like a direct copy of The Legend of Zelda, but I can guarantee you, it is definitely not.

The story is simple. Zelda’s brother wanted to find the Triforce of Courage (a mystical part of a golden triangle that grants the beholder their greatest desire). Zelda knew where it was, but would not tell her brother, so a wizard, a friend of the Prince of Hyrule cast a strong sleeping spell on Zelda. Years later Link is told about Zelda, and so, as a result, you take Link on an adventure through Hyrule to place crystals in six dungeons, to be able to find the Triforce. Oh and, by the way, Ganon is in the process of being resurrected. Find the Triforce and save the world.

To progress in the game, each dungeon, or temple, must be visited and completed in the correct order. By completing some dungeons and collected certain items or by learning particular spells from the elders in the towns, you can move into areas previously inaccessible. The main difference in gameplay is the mixture of a far out top down view and the side scrolling platformer view. Link can jump and duck when in this view, with fighting being less frenzied sword swiping and more tactical offense and defense. There is also an experience system where attack, magic and health can be upgraded using points gained from killing enemies. This is an in depth action RPG.

If I haven’t made it clear already, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is an incredibly difficult game (the number of times I’ve died…), yet it’s incredibly satisfying to play. It’s a game of many introductions in the Zelda series. The introduction to towns, conversational characters and Dark Link. As for the immersion side of thing, it’s game of discovery, peril and real adventure. Zelda II is truly magical and is essential to any gamer, even if it is a little different to what may be expected.

Notes

  1. scarecrowssong posted this